New Yamaha Intermediate Flutes YFL-362H / YFL-382H / YFL-462H / YFL-482H at Hyson Music!

The new line of Yamaha intermediate flutes includes the successors to the ever-popular step-up instruments the Yamaha YFL-3xx and 4xx series. The new models will continue with the 3 and 4 series designation.

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New Yamaha Intermediate Flutes

Yamaha Intermediate Flute with Sterling Head and Offset-G YFL-362H and YFL-382H (inline-G)

Yamaha Intermediate Flute with Sterling Head and Body, Offset-G YFL-462H and YFL-482H (inline-G)

The new line of Yamaha intermediate flutes includes the successors to the ever-popular step-up instruments the Yamaha YFL-3xx and 4xx series. The new models will continue with the 3 and 4 series designation. However, the new 3-series flutes will be the YFL-362H and YFL-382H (offset-G and inline-G respecitively), each of which feature a sterling silver head joint and silver plated body along with a b-foot. Either model is also available with an optional gold-plated lip plate (YFL-362H/LPGP and YFL-382H/LPGP).

The Yamaha YFL-462H and YFL-482H (offset-G and inline-G respectively) are the same flute as the 3 series flute, except the entire flute is sterling silver with silver-plated keys.

Pointed Key Arms

All intermediate Yamaha flutes will now feature pointed key-arms. With pointed key-arms, the pressure applied to the pad cup by the key arm is applied evenly throughout the surface of the key, which in turns improves the seal of the pad.

New Springs

Both the Yamaha Intermediate Flute series also offers new stainless steel springs that result in increased resistance to corrosion. Pad felts have also been modified to replicate the style and feel of the felts used in the professional line of flutes.

Lastly, the Yamaha YFL-362H and YFL-382H will now include the French-style case with a French case-cover which used to only be available on the 4-series flutes.

The 3-series and 4-series Yamaha intermediate flutes have been amazing step-up flutes for many years. Many progressing students make huge strides in their tone and playability when upgrading to intermediate level instruments. Just as with the student models, the intermediate Yamaha flutes produce a clean, focused, and easy tone that professing students and professionals alike love!

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Pre-Order Today

Hyson Music is excited to be amongst one of the first retailers to be offering these new models. We are now accepting pre-orders for the Yamaha intermediate flutes on HysonMusic.com. If interested in placing a pre-order, you can follow the link below:

http://www.hysonmusic.com/search.php?search_query=yamaha+intermediate+flute

If you’d like to place an order over the phone, and would like additional information, feel free to call us at 877-88HYSON!

Yamaha Standard Flute YFL-222 at Hyson Music!

Hyson Music is proud to announce we will be carrying the new line of Yamaha standard and intermediate flutes announced today at NAMM 2016.

Yamaha Standard Flute YFL-222

Hyson Music is proud to announce we will be carrying the new line of Yamaha standard and intermediate flutes announced today at NAMM 2016. The incredibly popular and arguably best standard flute on the market has been the Yamaha YFL-221. Today, Yamaha announced the release of the successor, the Yamaha Standard Flute YFL-222 flute.

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Pointed Key-Arms

The first thing you’ll notice on the new Yamaha YFL-222 flute is the pointed key-arms. This immediately gives the appearance of a flute that is of a higher caliber of the predecessor. With pointed key-arms, the pressure applied by the arms to the pad cups is evenly distributed accoss the entire top surface of the key, as opposed to just the edge of the key, ultimately providing a better seal.

New Offset-G Design

The Yamaha YFL-222 flute is also featuring a redesigned offset-G key system. The new design provides easier access for repair technicians, but also extends the playing life. Also upgraded on the Yamaha YFL-222 flute is the spring system, with the new flute model now featuring stainless steel springs that will increase the resistance to corrosion.

New Pad Felts

Pad felts have also been updated and now replicate the style and thickness of those found in their professional line resulting in a more precise seal.

Ultimately, Yamaha has taken the best and has made it better! Hyson Music is excited to carry the new flutes which we have been told will start shipping in March of 2016. We are now accepting pre-orders on our website of the new flute. You can place a pre-order at HysonMusic.com by following this link:

http://www.hysonmusic.com/product/woodwinds/flutes/student-flutes/yamaha-standard-flute-yfl-222/

For more information, or to place an order over the phone please call us at 877-88HYSON!

4 Tips for Music Students This Summer

4 Tips for Music Students This Summer

 

As the school year comes to the close, many students will find themselves occupied with various summer activities. The summer is, without question, the most critical time for a student to maintain a regular practice schedule.

The students who practice regularly over the summer will show up to class in the fall dramatically ahead of their peers who left their instrument under the bed for the summer.

Tip 1: Frequency Beats Duration

Summer can be hectic, even though it’s supposed to be a “vacation”. The 45-minute a day, 3x a week practice schedule might be impossible to keep up.  A student will be much better off playing just five minutes at a time a few times a week, then playing for an hour in one session. Regardless of which instrument you or a child plays, there are muscles involved that will become weak with a lack of practice. Try to be consistent, even if it the length of time is short!

 

Tip 2: Fun Music

Those classical etudes can start to get boring, and summer is all about fun! Now is a great time to pick up music for fun. We’ve seen such a huge demand for the fun stuff as summer approaches, we just started to stock “The Big Book of Disney Songs”. It’s a best-selling series that covers a wide-range of levels from beginners to advanced players, so it’s a book that can follow with you over the next few years.

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Find Disney Books Here!

Tip 3: Use a Metronome

When playing alone the use of a metronome is essential. You don’t have a conductor standing in front of you or a drum section keeping things in time. You probably already have a metronome and you should implement it in every practice session over the summer. This will ultimately lead to clock-like timing as your ability matures.

The Korg TM-50 makes a great all-in-one metronome and tuner! 

Tip 4: Instrument Maintenance

If you ignore everything in this email and decide not to play all summer, the most important thing is some regular maintenance on your instrument. An instrument that sits in a case for months may not be in great playing condition come the start of next season.

Brass instruments should have slides and valves pulled, wiped down, re-oiled and greased, and reassembled. Wind instruments should have tone holes cleaned, bores cleaned, mouthpieces washed and sanitized. Drummers can ensure their drums are tuned, in the summer heat drum heads tend to stretch and loosen, resulting in a bad sound.

Here are all our maintenance kits.

Tip 5. Bonus Tip

Have a great summer! You’ve worked hard all year learning and advancing with your instrument. Now is the time to show off and really enjoy it!

Viking M58S Tenor Saxophone Review

Viking M58S Tenor Review

 

Today, we are going to review the Viking M58S Tenor Saxophone in Gold Cognac finish!

Viking Musical Instruments is a small New York based company making a big splash on the saxophone scene. One of their most popular models is the well-reviewed and sought-after Viking M58S Tenor Saxophone, which is now in its second generation.

We had heard some rumblings about the ground Viking was gaining, and decided it would be wise to carry the brand in our stores.

Joe North, a local professional sax player joined us for a day to play through some horns. Joe was using an otto-link tone edge mouthpiece with a Vandoren Java Tenor reed and a rovner ligature in the testing of this instrument.

The Viking comes in a few finishes, but the one here today is a Cognac Aged Gold Lacquer finish. It’s a beautiful dark color with a glossy finish.

The Viking features an underslung octave mechanism. It has a design, and a pleasantly similar sound to the vintage super balanced action and Mark VI tenor’s in which it was modeled after. It includes a well built soft case, mouthpiece, cap, and ligature.

Joe noted this horn had a huge big sound, but maintained a great mellow tone throughout the range. Joe really enjoyed the ergonomics of the horn, finding all the keys were in a very comfortable position and it ‘just felt right’.  The palm keys are slightly recessed toward the instrument, and although it was a bit different than he is used to, he said they felt very comfortable. Lastly, Joe noted the horn demonstrated very quiet mechanics – making it a great studio horn.

If you’re a sax player looking for the classic feel and sound of a vintage Mark VI, but desire a reliable and affordable instrument, the Viking M58S Tenor Saxophone is absolutely worth checking out!

We will have the video review posted soon!

 

Wood Clarinets in a Cold and Dry Climate: A first hand experience

Wood Clarinets in Cold and Dry Climate: A first hand experience

 

We are located in New York, and this 2014/2015 winter has been a brutal one. It was exceptionally cold, exceptionally dry, and the weather persisted far longer than normal. This weather has wreaked havoc on our display model clarinets.

I’d like to share what happens when clarinet wood shrinks from dryness and cold combined, and how we handled rectifying the situation. I’ll start by saying this is not a typical scenario for a clarinet player. Most clarinet players are playing daily, or several times a week, and this regular practice schedule maintains moisture and humidity in the instrument.

Let’s pretend you don’t keep the practice schedule you should, and perhaps your clarinet was left under your bed for the last six months. This is similar to our instruments on display in our store, they are kept on our slat-wall display. Here and there a customer comes in and plays them for a few minutes, but for the most part they just sit there.

To our surprise, one of our display models recently had some binding keys. After sending the instrument through our repair shop it was found the wood had shrunk to a degree where it was causing the posts to push together on the rods causing friction on the keys. After seeing this, we checked all of our clarinets, and lo and behold there were several with similar problems.

With seven years of retail, we never had issues with our display model clarinets. Sure, sometimes bell rings will loosen, or tenon rings might fall off in the winter, but never have we had keys binding.

Wood is very delicate and sensitive to environmental changes, so we wanted to correct the situation without causing any quick or dramatic shift to the wood. The clarinet was fully disassembled and the pieces were simply placed in a plastic bag with a small glycol (cigar humidor) humidifier and left to rest for 72-hours.

The instrument was reassembled and is now perfect, with no binding and no issues. The rings all fit snugly as they should. Allowing the wood to slowly rehydrate itself over the course of several days prevented any cracking or splits that might occur by quickly trying to repair the problem.

The point of this article is if you havn’t played your clarinet in a long time and some keys are binding, there is a good chance it’s not a mechanical issue but the constriction of the wood itself. You should VERY slowly allow the instrument to humidify and expand then re-evaluate the situation. Perhaps you will save on a repair bill, and at the very least you’ll save by preventing a potential crack by blowing warm and humid air into an instrument in this state!

Eastman 52nd Street Alto and Tenor Saxophone’s Revisited

Eastman 52nd Street Alto and Tenor Saxophone’s Revisited

 

We were an early adopter of the Eastman 52nd Street saxophone line. In our area of New York, we remain one of few retailers to actually stock these horns. It’s been a few years now, and I think it’s worth revisiting these horns.

The Eastman 52nd Street Alto comes only in a beautiful un-lacquered finish. It’s got a large bell and is quite a heavy horn. It is extremely free blowing with just a huge dark and powerful sound.

There are many fads that seem to come and go in the music industry, where horns pop up here and there, get a ton of positive coverage, and then slowly disappear into distant memory.

Eastman has remained on top, offering an amazing horn at a great price. Many of our customers have now come back two years later, still loving their horn every day, still comparing them to their vintage Mark VI’s (favorably I might add), and have horns that are functioning in excellent condition.

One of the initial apprehensions I found our customers had, was purchasing an instrument that was a new model and a new make. We’ve had horns that play amazing out of the box, then a year later pieces start falling off, the struggling small company that introduced it goes out of business, and you’re stuck with a useless instrument and no recourse. This is certainly not the case with either the alto or tenor Eastman 52nd Street saxophones.

The only struggle we’ve experienced with the Eastman horns is keeping them in stock! With their huge popularity it’s difficult to keep them in stock, they come in and go right out and we find they are backordered for weeks or months as Eastman tries to keep pace with the high demand.

We have some videos coming soon to our HysonMusicTV Youtube channel that will have sound samples and a more comprehensive overview of the entire package, including the case that is included.

Another horn that has gotten a lot of positive social publicity lately is the Viking M58S Tenor Saxophone. We are also one of few retailers in the country to carry the Viking line. If you are considering something like the Eastman 52nd tenor,  you should also take a moment to check out the Viking M58 series. They are great horns and similar to each other. Many people who try both typically find themselves debating which one they like better. There is never a clear winner, so it’s worth checking them both out!

On the alto side, many people have difficulty choosing between the P. Mauriat alto saxophones and the Eastman 52nd Street horns – again, if you are in the market for a pro-level saxophone you should definitely check out the P. Mauriat line in addition to the Yamaha and Yanigsawa lines! They all offer amazing horns that are widely used by many professionals.

If you have questions, or would like to purchase a horn, please feel free to contact Hyson Music at 516.433.1107.

Protec Max Trumpet Case – Rectangular and Contoured

Protec makes some amazing cases, but not always such an amazing price. To answer the call of budget conscious consumers, Protec created the MAX line of cases.

The MAX line for trumpet offers two different style cases. There is a traditional rectangular case, in addition to the contoured gig-bag style case.

The contoured style case is currently available in black or camo, while the rectangular case is available in black or blue. The rectangular case is 5lbs and has plenty of storage. Themaxtrumpet2 contoured case sacrifices storage for lighter weight, weighing in only at three and a half pounds.
It’s a very light case made from nylon, with an EPS Foam interior to protect the instrument.

The interiors are lined in a soft plush material, and includes two mouthpiece holders, as well as two accessory compartments in the rectangular case. The contoured case only has one mouthpiece holder, but with the outside accessory compartment you can easily store another mouthpiece in the case.

They both include an adjustable shoulder strap, in addition to the padded grips, which also lock together with a velcro closure. The contoured style case includes backpack straps, hidden behind a panel. There are also nice rubber feet on the bottom of the cases so they won’t get scuffed up when setting it down.
Trumpet players are often denied any additional storage or pockets on with their factory cases. Fortunately, when upgrading to the Max case you will get a nice zipper pocket that covers the entire span of the case.

The MAX cases also feature nice rubber gripped zipper pulls attached to a heavy-duty zipper. Zippers are notoriously difficult on cases, with students often breaking them, at this price point the zipper is much nicer than many less expensive alternatives – so this should not be a problem.maxtrumpet

This case makes a great upgrade for any trumpet player. It’s far lighter than most factory cases and offers better protection! If you are an ‘on-the-road’ musician and travel often, you should consider spending some more and upgrading to a Protec ProPac case.

Please visit our YouTube channel for a video review!

 

 

 

 

Protec Max Flute Case Review

Protec makes some amazing cases, but not always at such an amazing price. To answer the call of budget conscious consumers, Protec created the MAX line of cases.

This Protec Mprotec flute2ax Flute Case is currently available in black, blue, purple, and pink. It’s a very light case made from nylon, with an EPS Foam interior to protect the instrument. It weighs in at only two pounds.

The interior is lined in a soft velvoa lining, so it won’t scratch or scuff the silver finish of a flute.

It includes an adjustable shoulder strap, in addition to the padded grips, which also lock together with a velcro closure.

This case will accommodate both a B foot and C foot flute.

Flute players are always denied any additional storage or pockets on with their factory cases, fortunately when upgrading the Max case, you will final get a nice zipper pocket that covers the entire span of the case – perfect for holding small accessories. It can even hold a piccolo case!

The MAX cases also feature nice rubber gripped zipper pulls attached to a heavy-duty zipper. Zippers are notoriously difficult on cases, with students often breaking them, at this price point the zipper is muchproetcflute nicer than many less expensive alternatives, and shouldn’t be a problem on this problem.

This case makes a great upgrade for any flute player. It’s far lighter than most factory cases and offers better protection! For serious musicians who travel a lot and rely on subways, buses, or go other places where your case might experience more wear and tear, you will want to spend the extra money on something from Protec’s Pro Pac line.

For a video review please visit our YouTube channel HysonMusicTV or click the video below.

Protec Max Clarinet Case Review

Protec Max Clarinet Case Review

 

Protec makes some amazing cases, but not always at such an amazing price. To answer the call of budget-conscious consumers, Protec created the MAX line of cases.maxclarinet2

This Protec MAX Clarinet Case is currently available in black, blue, purple, and pink. It’s a very light case made from nylon, with a EPS Foam interior to protect the instrument. It weighs in at less than two pounds.

The interior is lined in a soft plush lining with molded depressions to secure each piece of the instrument. It includes an adjustable shoulder strap, in addition to the padded grips, which also lock together with a velcro closure.

Clarinet players are always denied any additional storage or pockets on with their factory cases. Fortunately when upgrading to the MAX case, you will final get a nice zipper pocket that covers the entire span of the case – perfect for holding reeds, cleaning cloths, swabs, and small accessories.

The MAX cases also feature nice rubber gripped zipper pulls attached to a heavy-duty zipper. Zippers amaxclarinetre notoriously problematic on cases, with students often breaking them, at this price point the zipper is much nicer than many less expensive alternatives, and shouldn’t be a problem on this problem.

This case makes a great upgrade for most clarinet players. It’s far lighter than most factory cases and offers better protection! If you are an ‘on the road’ musician and traveling a lot, you’d be wise to spend a little more and upgrade to something from the Protec Pro Pac line.

View a video review of this case on our Youtube Channel!

Protec Max Alto Saxophone Case Review

Protec Max Alto Saxophone Case Review

Protec makes some amazing cases, but not always at  such an amazing price. To answer the call of budget-conscious consumers, Protec created the MAX line of cases.maxsax3

This Protec MAX Alto Saxophone case is available in two flavors. There is a standard rectangular case, and a contoured style. The rectangular case offers abundant storage for music folders, accessories, and more. The contoured case provides much less storage, but is a smaller and lighter package. The rectangular case weighs 6 pounds, while the contoured weighs 4.

 

Both cases are made from nylon, with an EPS Foam interior to protect the instrument.

The interior is lined in a soft plush lining with molded depressions to secure each piece of the instrument.maxsax2

It includes an adjustable shoulder strap, in addition to the padded grips, which also lock together with a velcro closure. There are also hidden backpack straps beneath a flat on the rear of the case.

The MAX cases also feature nice rubber gripped zipper pulls attached to a heavy-duty zipper. Zippers are notoriously problematic on cases, with students often breaking them. At this price point, the zipper is much nicer than many less expensive alternatives, and shouldn’t be a problem.

maxsaxThis case makes a great upgrade for most sax players. It’s far lighter than most factory cases and offers better protection! If you are an ‘on the road’ musician and traveling a lot, you’d be wise to spend a little more and upgrade to something from the Protec Pro Pac line.

You can also visit our Youtube channel and see a video review of this product!